if somebody wants to make sure that Google’s going to kind of give crawling priority to some pages, and so they’ve got a massive e-commerce site, it’s a good idea in that situation to use this kind of strategy, isn’t it? Just to make sure you’re only really including in that XML sitemap things that really are vital as such?

So the other week there was an interview, and Gary was talking about XML sitemaps and saying that the various functions that contribute to importance, for instance, when crawling potentially to build the things, too. So he said, if you include things in a sitemap that they’re considered more important. Presumably, then– you know, you’ve got your custom word– you’ve got your standard, at out-of-the-box WordPress XML site map which just throws everything into it. So for instance, in these types of situations, if somebody wants to make sure that Google’s going to kind of give crawling priority to some pages, and so they’ve got a massive e-commerce site, it’s a good idea in that situation to use this kind of strategy, isn’t it? Just to make sure you’re only really including in that XML sitemap things that really are vital as such?

Webmaster Guru Asked on December 1, 2016 in Sitemaps.
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1 Answer(s)

JOHN MEULLER (Webmaster Analyst from Google):

You can pretty much include everything in your sitemap file.We’ll try to crawl that.The important thing with the sitemap file,specifically in a case like this,is that it’s a reasonable sitemap file–that we’ve learned to be able to trust it,in the sense that you don’t use like today as a last modification date for all of the pages across your website,but rather that you that last modification date in a realistic way.So that we kind of learn that this last modification is actually have some useful information that would help us to better understand.

 

Webmaster Guru Answered on December 1, 2016.
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