My website is currently using HTML version four. Is there any benefit to going to HTML version 5 and tagging up the header footer content? Even though we already use schema.org, can this help with rankings?

My website is currently using HTML version four. Is there any benefit to going to HTML version 5 and tagging up the header footer content? Even though we already use schema.org, can this help with rankings?

Webmaster Guru Asked on October 17, 2016 in HTML.
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1 Answer(s)

JOHN MEULLER (Webmaster Analyst from Google):

I suspect there are benefits of moving to HTML five. But they don’t affect Google search. So whether or not you’re on HTML– I don’t know– two, three, or four or XHTML or HTML five, that’s all something that we kind of have to deal with and pull that content out of there in a normal way. And it shouldn’t affect rank. So just for search itself, I wouldn’t necessarily move to HTML five. that you might want to move to HTML five or move some things to HTML five. But at least for search itself, that’s not something where you’d have to do that. We noticed we have more internal links pointing to our Contact Us and Terms and Conditions and About Us pages, as opposed to our category pages which are the ones that we want Google to see the most. Should we be looking at changing this so that we have more links going to the categories? I think this happened because Contact Us are situated in both the nav and the footer. The good news is we– kind of like with broken HTML– a lot of websites have Contact Us and Terms and Conditions and About Us pages. It’s something that we see linked within a lot of web pages. Within a website, usually it’s linked from every page. So there is no need to do this page rank sculpting that was in half a decade ago where people would use no follow links pointing to the About Us page because it’s not that important. That’s something that our algorithms can deal with really well already. So you don’t really need to do anything special there. You don’t need to change the URLs around and change the Contact Us page to be a category page or anything crazy like that. So we generally would pick up the links to these individual pages, maybe the Contact Us page. And from there, if you have a normal navigation on your website, then we can forward that page rank, those signals to the other pages on your website and try to rank those appropriately.So it’s not something that you would need to kind of artificially force Google to devalue your Contact Us page and recognize your other pages as being more important in a relative sense. So I would just keep that set up. Make sure that your navigation works really well. Make sure that your important category pages are linked properly from the rest of your website so that people can get there very quickly. And we should be able to pick that up from there. Our articles on our blog section can also be accessed by selecting to view articles for particular months. For example, show me all articles from September 2016. Should this be a no index no follow as it’s almost like an attribute or a sort? Or can something like this affect rankings? Usually I wouldn’t bother with doing anything special for a page like that. If you think it really doesn’t make sense to index like that, I would just put a no index on it. But it’s not something that I’d say would be a critical thing or that it would visibly affect your search rankings if you changed your monthly archive pages to no index or something like that. So I would definitely not change it to no follow. Because it’s useful for us to actually pick up the individual articles that you’re linking from those pages.

 

 

Webmaster Guru Answered on October 17, 2016.
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