We have an old and big website with over 10 million pages. Recently we discovered that content that was published during 2011, 2013, ranks three times better than newer content with the same quality, same linking, HTML. Could it be that when old pages were published we had a higher website authority or something that Google memorized and we don’t have anymore? Or for new pages, Google is applying more strict rules than for old content?

We have an old and big website with over 10 million pages.Recently we discovered that content that was published during 2011, 2013, ranks three times better than newer content with the same quality, same linking, HTML.We thought that this was the result of content aging.But then we analyzed traffic for the last three years,and it looks like those pages were always successful.Could it be that when old pages were published we had a higher website authority or something that Google memorized and we don’t have anymore? Or for new pages, Google is applying more strict rules than for old content?

Webmaster Guru Asked on June 7, 2017 in Content Issues.
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1 Answer(s)

JOHN MEULLER (Webmaster Analyst from Google):

So it’s really hard to say without looking at the actual situation there. But in general, when we have something that’s like a sitewide score, then the current sitewide score applies to everything for that website. So from my point of view, we don’t have anything like a website authority score. But if we did have something like that or if we have– when we’re looking at, for example, quality signals that are more sitewide, then that’s something that applies across the whole website in the state that it’s at now. So it’s not the case that we would say, oh, five years ago, you had this score for your website. Therefore, your contact will be rated like this forever. But rather we look at your website overall now, and we apply the current score to all of your pages on the website. So that’s what we do when it comes to sitewide signals.

Webmaster Guru Answered on June 7, 2017.
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